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Teacher’s Day 2020: Top 5 books about learning every teacher must read

Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan who said "Instead of celebrating my birthday, it would be my proud privilege if 5 September is observed as Teachers’ Day," the day originated. 

By Newsd
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Teacher’s Day 2020: Top 5 books about learning every teacher must read
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Teachers’ Day is celebrated in India on September 5 every year. The day is observed on the occasion of the birth anniversary of the first Vice President of India Dr Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan.

The great Indian philosopher and teacher gave us many teachings that still guide us through a rocky road. Since 1962, his birthday has been celebrated as Teacher’s Day. In a famous quote by Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan who said “Instead of celebrating my birthday, it would be my proud privilege if 5 September is observed as Teachers’ Day,” the day originated.

On this day, students honor their teachers all over the country and seek their blessings. The bond between a student and a teacher has always been precious from Arjuna-Dhronacharya times.

On the occasion of Teacher’s Day, here are the top 5 books about learning every teacher should read:

Developing Mind by Art Costa

This book is a collection of short essays/chapters that explore different strands of how people think, and how to better teach it. Chapters include Teaching Thinking in Science, Teaching for Transfer, Making Thinking Visible, and What is Problem-Solving?

Teaching What Matters Most by Richard W. Strong, Harvey F. Silver, Matthew J. Perini

This short book offers 4 standards for prioritizing in your classroom: Rigor, Thought, Diversity, and Authenticity. It defines each and offers a helpful rubrics to begin measuring how each standard does or does not function in your classroom.

Why Don’t Students Like School? by Daniel Willingham

A central claim in this book is that while we are naturally curious, we are not naturally good at thinking and can only truly think about things we know. It also contains one of the best lines ever to feature in a book on education: “Memory is the residue of thought.”

Seven Myths About Education by Daisy Christodoulou

Christodoulou challenges several orthodoxies in education such as prioritising skills over knowledge, the claim that teacher-led instruction is passive, and why you can’t just look it up on Google.

Bringing Words to Life by Isabel L Beck, Margaret G McKeown, and Linda Kucan

The authors offer a three-tier model: tier one words are those that rarely require instruction such as “dog” or “run”, tier two consists of words that have “high utility for mature language users” such as “contradict” or “precede”, and tier three words are domain-specific such as “pantheon” or “epidermis”. Tier two words are of vital importance to children’s development and this book provides sage advice on how to expand that vital range, along with a range of different approaches to broaden children’s vocabulary.

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