Tech, World

Graphene seive turns sea water to drinking water

A team of researchers based in UK created has created a graphene-based sieve capable of transforming sea water into drinking water.

The discovery by a team at the University of Manchester has the potential to revolutionise water filtration across the world.

Professor Rahul Nair, who led the team of researchers in Manchester, says it is a “significant step forward” that will “open new possibilities for improving the efficiency of desalination technology”.

Graphene, a form of carbon with just one atom thick and 200 times stronger than steel, was originally isolated by two researchers at the University of Manchester in 2004 – Professor Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov.

According to new global report released to mark World Water Day, 663 million people internationally are without clean water and the vast majority of them, 522 million – live in rural areas.

Around 315,000 children aged under five die from diseases caused by dirty water every year.

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