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Home » Tech » Disposing, reusing and creating jobs from e-waste now easy: Scientist Veena Sahajwalla

Disposing, reusing and creating jobs from e-waste now easy: Scientist Veena Sahajwalla

By Newsd
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Disposing, reusing and creating jobs from e-waste now easy: Scientist Veena Sahajwalla
IndianWeb2.com

Managing loads and piles of dumped phones, laptops, printers and various other gadgets is a massive modern-day challenge that every city and country is dealing with. Amid the struggle has appeared an India-born Australian Veena Sahajwalla, who has come up with solutions to effectively dispose or reuse the electronic waste. In fact, the scientist says that end-of-life electronic products offer huge economic and job-generating potential in country like India which produces over two million tonnes of electronic waste every year.

Veena Sahajwalla, the materials scientist at University of New South Wales, has invented microfactories that can transform e-waste into reusable material to be converted into ceramics and plastic filaments for3D printing. The high-grade metals like gold, silver, copper, palladium found in the e-waste can be separated for re-sale in conditions that are totally safe.

Also read: Australian scientists develops ‘sponge’ for cleaning oil spills

Recalling PM Narendra Modi’s Swachh Bharat and Make in India Campaign, scientist Veena speaks us of the various solutions uncovering significant value in e-dumps.

According to Veena’s invention, country like India, with huge number of rag-pickers daily collecting and separating waste, has advantage. All the street scrap collectors can be employed, trained and introduced to the microfactories.

“What we and the government need to do is give them the technology, deploy the (e-waste) microfactories and teach them how it works. What will happen is that, instead of burning that e-waste, these people will be working in a sustainable and safe environment without producing any kind of toxic waste,” said Mumbai born Veena.

This way, she said, we are not displacing the rag-pickers. Instead, we can create more job opportunities.

She also said her solution fitted in perfectly with Prime Minister Modi’s mission Make in India and Swachh Bharat missions.

A modular microfactory, which would require a 50 sq mt area, can be located wherever waste is stockpiled. The science behind these factories would be brought in from Australia. These microfactories are affordable, can be built locally and will help empower the people working with waste.

With the inputs of IANS.

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